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lettuce Lactuca sativa

Lettuce has been planted 122 times by Growstuff members.

Predictions

lettuce is an annual crop (living and reproducing in a single year or less)

Median lifespan

106 days

First harvest expected

37 days after planting

Last harvest expected

105 days after planting

Photos

lettuce plantings

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Lettuce

lettuce harvests

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lettuce seeds

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Sunniness

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Planted from

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Harvested for

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Varieties

butterhead lettuce
lifespan 74 days
celtuce
Lactuca sativa var. asparagina
cos lettuce
lifespan 50 days
frilly lettuce
lifespan 72 days
iceberg letture
Lactuca sativa
lifespan 89 days
red lettuce
lifespan 84 days
romaine lettuce
Lactuca sativa var. longifolia
lifespan 88 days

Crop Map

Only plantings by members who have set their locations are shown on this map.

What people are saying about lettuces

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How to save seeds

Beans, peas and corn: remove husks and allow seeds to dry out – this may take a couple of weeks, then remove casings and store.

Pumpkins and melons: seeds need to be washed and set aside to dry for a week or so before storage.

Lettuce, celery, parsnip, rocket, carrots, leeks, onions and radicchio: allow plants to set seed (tall stems of flowers will eventually appear), pick once the seed heads are brown and crisp sounding. Hang upside down in plastic bags for a week or so, rustle the remaining seeds out of the stems and store.

Cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchini, chillies and capsicums: scoop out flesh and wash through a sieve. Lay the seeds on a paper towel and place somewhere warm and dry for a week or two before storing. Be careful with chilli seeds as they can sting, so avoid touching your eyes after touching the seeds. Once completely dry, cut the paper towel into small pieces and store seeds on the towel in an envelope.

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Coming together

This weekend I had two full days to really focus on the yard, and I made the most of it. With the intermittent help of several others over the course of the weekend, I got both easement planter boxes filled with compost and soil, cleaned up and weeded the alley, got the stump pulled from the conifer thing we took out last year, finished leveling the railroad ties for the terraced area of the yard, and got most of the front yard backfilled.

Tina's grabbing another load of compost on Tuesday, so we should be able to get the third planter bed in the alley filled before the last frost date. I still have to clean up and mow the backyard, get and spread wood chips, and figure out what we're planting in the front yard, but it's really starting to come together. It's hard to believe that this time last year, I didn't feel like I had a clue what I was doing growing plants, and our yard was ugly as all get out. Now we have a retaining wall and terrace and three planter boxes we built ourselves. I'm making a big effort to grow a significant amount of vegetables this year.

Last year, really the only food crops I grew were some tomatoes and broccoli. This year, we've already have lettuce, arugula, mustard greens, sunflower, dill, red onion and beet in the ground, and tomato, fenugreek, bell pepper, okra, artichoke, pot marigold, mint, lavender, spinach, basil, thyme, and parsley sprouting for when it gets a bit warmer. That's not taking into account the summer squash, zucchini, and peas we have waiting to plant directly in the bed once we're past final frost date.

In addition to the edibles, we got a black cherry fuschia and a (I think?) night owl climbing rose. I also repotted the ficus and one of the tropical plants Rachel gave me last year that I've forgotten the name of. Oh, and I finally planted some of the spaces in the retaining wall! I put in some rockfoil, creeping red thyme, sedum, and Scottish moss. The Scottish moss looks especially nice, with it's bright lime green against the red lava rocks. I really hope they take and start to fill in this season!

Whew! Writing it all down, this was quite the weekend! I'm so glad I got a chance to do this! I'll have to take some pictures in the next few days to really capture where it is now.

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Getting ready for spring!

I've got seeds either on-hand or ordered for just about everything I'm starting from seed this year. I've been working out what I want to plant, and this is the plan I've come up with for the 72 square feet of my backyard raised beds:

garden plan

Key:

Beets are fast enough (only 2 months) that I figure I can safely interplant them with the squashes.

I also picked up some chamomile seeds yesterday. I like chamomile tea, and it'll help attract pollinators. I have what I intend to be a food forest further back in my yard, past the raised beds, and I think it can go in there, around the berry bushes I intend to plant this spring.

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First strawberry!

I had the first tiny strawberry of the season today! I'm looking forward to many more.

Also, I transplanted a lot of seedlings into the community garden today: 2 cucumbers, 3 green beans, 2 tongue-of-fire beans, an ornamental sweet potato, and an artichoke.

I also scattered some lettuce seed, sowed trenches for radish, carrot, and parsnip seeds, and planted more green beans, tongue-of-fire beans, and several sunflowers.

We'll see what takes.

And I transplanted one of my alpine strawberries into a bigger pot, which means that eventually I'll have a lot of big strawberry pots.

My serviceberry bushes looked a bit yellow today. I'll drop some leaf compost on them, but if anyone knows more about what they need, I'd love to hear it.

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State of the Spring Garden

Finally some seasonably warm weather.

The peas are shooting up rather quickly. The lettuce has sprouted. Beets are up. Turnip are getting their second set of leaves so I will be thinning them out this week. Radish going strong. And I believe I saw the Swiss Chard starting to break the soil. It's all good!

Interesting bit of something in regards to the beet I have 6 squares. All were planted at the same time and all are the same variety -- Detroit Dark Red. The 3 squares that were planted with Burpee seeds were slower to germinate and I have fewer seedlings from each pellet. The other 3 squares that were planted with Botanical Interest seeds came up quicker, stronger, and with more seedlings. So note to self -- next planting of beets stick with Botanical Interest seeds.

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Transplant day!

I originally wanted to do this yesterday but it rained in the morning so that kinda put a damper on things.

So I did it all today instead! A bunch of the seeds I wintersowed in the milk jugs and soda bottles were getting crowded so it was time to move them to their bigger (permanent) containers. The ones I transplanted were: the mesclun mix, spinach, mizuna, arugula, tatsoi, pak choi, freckled lettuce, radicchio and broccoli rabe.

I also (finally) tended to my garden beds. Lots of earthworms in them, yay! That said, I also found a couple cicadas as I was tilling the ground, boo! I wonder how many from Brood II are going to be coming up from my backyard! :O Anyway, not to be deterred, I sowed alogbate (Malabar spinach) and okra. I was a little late in sowing the alogbate this year but it was so cold late into the season, I just didn't want to go out. Should be okay though.

Thanks to the warm weather, the parsley and anise in the herb garden have recovered and perked up from their overwintering and I cleaned them up a bit, pulling away the debris and dead bits. I also see that my lilies have started to come up in their place by the stairs.

Tomorrow, I'm going to go out and spread the sluggo. I saw some slug eggs while I was tilling (smashed them) so I know they're around somewhere. Now that I've popped the greens out of their wintersown containers and out into the open, I need to be vigilant about that.