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tomato Solanum lycopersicum

Tomato has been planted 211 times by Growstuff members.

Predictions

tomato is an annual crop (living and reproducing in a single year or less)

Median lifespan

146 days

First harvest expected

86 days after planting

Last harvest expected

119 days after planting

Photos

tomato plantings

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Rose de Berne tomato
Sungold tomato
Tomato Patch 04 June 2013
Red Robin Dwarf 04 June 2013
tomato

tomato harvests

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tomato seeds

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more photos

Sunniness

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Planted from

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Harvested for

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Varieties

adoration tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
alicante tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Amish paste tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Aunt Ruby's German green tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
azoychka tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
beefsteak tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 84 days
better boy tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
big rainbow tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Blaby special tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
black krim tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
brandywine tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 181 days
campari tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
celebrity tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Cherokee purple tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 165 days
cherry tomato
Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme
lifespan 126 days
early girl tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Fourth of July tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
garden peach tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
grape tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
green zebra tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Hanover tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
hillbilly tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
jubilee tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lillian's yellow tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
marglobe tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
mortgage lifter tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
Mr. Stripey tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
opalka tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 181 days
pear tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 172 days
Roma tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
lifespan 181 days
San Marzano tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
stupice tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
three sisters tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
tigerella tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
tomberry
Solanum lycopersicum
traveller tomato
Solanum lycopersicum
white queen tomato
Solanum lycopersicum

Crop Map

Only plantings by members who have set their locations are shown on this map.

What people are saying about tomatoes

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How to save seeds

Beans, peas and corn: remove husks and allow seeds to dry out – this may take a couple of weeks, then remove casings and store.

Pumpkins and melons: seeds need to be washed and set aside to dry for a week or so before storage.

Lettuce, celery, parsnip, rocket, carrots, leeks, onions and radicchio: allow plants to set seed (tall stems of flowers will eventually appear), pick once the seed heads are brown and crisp sounding. Hang upside down in plastic bags for a week or so, rustle the remaining seeds out of the stems and store.

Cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchini, chillies and capsicums: scoop out flesh and wash through a sieve. Lay the seeds on a paper towel and place somewhere warm and dry for a week or two before storing. Be careful with chilli seeds as they can sting, so avoid touching your eyes after touching the seeds. Once completely dry, cut the paper towel into small pieces and store seeds on the towel in an envelope.

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todo list

  • Plant more carrot
  • Plant the olive tree out front
  • Get new compost bin going
  • Clear out the tomato plants
  • Get a garden camera working
  • Get irrigator hooked up to home assistant
  • Install the xiaomi miflora in the herbs
  • Growstuff api!
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Some of features id like

I like to automate the calculations, analysis, and plain old remembering what has happened in the garden.

Some of the challenges in my garden is knowing when it's too late to planting something, if it will cope with the weather conditions here, and working out what is killing the tomato. The broccoli went into the on seed, I think because it was planted too early.

I suspect I've got consistently great yields of potato and carrot, but I'd need to more diligently record that to find out.

Remembering what I planted where, to properly crop rotate, would be useful.

I've mostly been a summer gardener, so knowing what to plant for successful winter gardening would be great.

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Shakey SHakey Town

We've been rock and rolling with 7.7 Earthquake at midnight and i lost count of how many 6-pointer aftershocks - and a tsunami evacuation.

Super tired, this morning we went home for about 90 minutes sleep - and then went looking for something normal (instead of our wavy shaken up house). School is closed, the city cordoned off. We ended up at the garden shop, it having the only cafe open on a Monday.

Lots of plants acquired. Many large tomato seedlings, three artichoke, some perpetual spinach and chives.

They'll mostly go into the large garden bed we need to dig (frame is built). They'll need wind shelter. We've got a high winds warning for tonight (YAY! more disasters) so the seedlings are sheltering behind a north fenced. The winds are nearly always northerly here, but a north fence of course also blocks the sun from the north - so it'll need something better.

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Coming together

This weekend I had two full days to really focus on the yard, and I made the most of it. With the intermittent help of several others over the course of the weekend, I got both easement planter boxes filled with compost and soil, cleaned up and weeded the alley, got the stump pulled from the conifer thing we took out last year, finished leveling the railroad ties for the terraced area of the yard, and got most of the front yard backfilled.

Tina's grabbing another load of compost on Tuesday, so we should be able to get the third planter bed in the alley filled before the last frost date. I still have to clean up and mow the backyard, get and spread wood chips, and figure out what we're planting in the front yard, but it's really starting to come together. It's hard to believe that this time last year, I didn't feel like I had a clue what I was doing growing plants, and our yard was ugly as all get out. Now we have a retaining wall and terrace and three planter boxes we built ourselves. I'm making a big effort to grow a significant amount of vegetables this year.

Last year, really the only food crops I grew were some tomatoes and broccoli. This year, we've already have lettuce, arugula, mustard greens, sunflower, dill, red onion and beet in the ground, and tomato, fenugreek, bell pepper, okra, artichoke, pot marigold, mint, lavender, spinach, basil, thyme, and parsley sprouting for when it gets a bit warmer. That's not taking into account the summer squash, zucchini, and peas we have waiting to plant directly in the bed once we're past final frost date.

In addition to the edibles, we got a black cherry fuschia and a (I think?) night owl climbing rose. I also repotted the ficus and one of the tropical plants Rachel gave me last year that I've forgotten the name of. Oh, and I finally planted some of the spaces in the retaining wall! I put in some rockfoil, creeping red thyme, sedum, and Scottish moss. The Scottish moss looks especially nice, with it's bright lime green against the red lava rocks. I really hope they take and start to fill in this season!

Whew! Writing it all down, this was quite the weekend! I'm so glad I got a chance to do this! I'll have to take some pictures in the next few days to really capture where it is now.

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Getting ready for spring!

I've got seeds either on-hand or ordered for just about everything I'm starting from seed this year. I've been working out what I want to plant, and this is the plan I've come up with for the 72 square feet of my backyard raised beds:

garden plan

Key:

Beets are fast enough (only 2 months) that I figure I can safely interplant them with the squashes.

I also picked up some chamomile seeds yesterday. I like chamomile tea, and it'll help attract pollinators. I have what I intend to be a food forest further back in my yard, past the raised beds, and I think it can go in there, around the berry bushes I intend to plant this spring.

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A slow start to summer

I'm so very, very behind on my gardening. I was travelling heaps and had lots of other commitments through October/November, which is peak spring planting time here, and nothing got done. I've come to the realisation that if I'm going to do work that involves that sort of travel, I need to cut myself some slack on the garden front, and not expect to eg. raise tomatoes from seed. Instead, I can buy seedlings. Which is what I did, in the end. I also hired someone to mow my lawn, which was blocking me from doing a bunch of things because I wanted to lay out more no-dig bed but the grass was so high and my lawnmower so useless (it's a little electric one, and I now have a large and triffid-like "lawn") that I couldn't even get started.

Anyway. Current status:

  • most winter/spring crops are finished, still have some cavalo nero ticking along surprisingly well considering the cabbage moths
  • my broad bean crop was late-sown but delicious; will definitely plant more, and earlier, next year
  • I have self-sown sunflowers, which are now considerably taller than I am; next year, I will make a point of scattering the seed intentionally in places where I want them.
  • I've been tossing arugula and sorrel seeds all over the place down the back of the yard, as I pull out or cut back plants that have gone to seed. Hopefully they'll grow in abundance next year!
  • I've planted half a dozen tomato plants, some from friends and some from the shop and a couple that actually made it from seed -- I am honestly not quite sure what I have but I think there's a tommy toe, a couple of jaune flammes, a wild sweetie, a lemon drop, one other biggish red one that I forget the variety of, and I have a few San Marzano tomato seedlings (raised from seed) ready to go in when I do get the new no-dig beds sorted. They'll be late but better than nothing.
  • I bought eggplant seedlings as my seeds didn't make it, and planted half a dozen "black beauty" and one "bianco rosso" or something (those beautiful pale ones)
  • I planted a habanero pepper (bought fairly advanced from the nursery) and some kind of Thai chilli, and I have a range of others coming up from seed which will be ready to plant out when the aforementioned no-dig bed is done.
  • Haven't planted a single zucchini or any other kind of squash yet, argh! But I planted them late last year too, and that was fine.

In short it's all a bit of a mess but it's sort of getting there, and it's better than nothing.

With regard to the development of Growstuff itself, I'm delighted with our move off the mailing lists and over to Growstuff Talk and would definitely love to invite anyone who's interested in how Growstuff is built, or just generally what happens under the hood, to come over and chat with us. We have an Idea forum where it'd be great to get more people's input!

Some recent discussions that you might like to weigh in on:

Also new: the other day I did some work on updating our README on github and making a better Get Involved page on the wiki. Hopefully they make it easier for people who aren't necessarily coders to see how they could be a part of this :)

This afternoon, I'm going to try and get some of that no-dig action happening and maybe even plant some squash. Wish me luck!

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New feature - crop mentions!

So we have this new feature where if you mention a crop like tomato or lemon or dill using the Markdown syntax (like: [dill](crop)), your post will show up on the crop page. Click through to any of those crops, scroll down, and take a look!

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Swap/trade (Australia): want large planting containers, will swap for seedlings/seeds/preserves/baked goods/ginger beer

I'm in Thornbury, in the inner northern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia.

Our landlords won't let us replace the lawn with a veg garden, so we can only plant in containers. I'm on my usual spring quest for largish containers, 30cm diameter and above. We especially love the old-style rectangular recycling tubs that the cities of Darebin and Moreland used to use before they got wheelie bins -- a great size, and they already have drainage holes in them.

Do you have any of these sorts of tubs/containers available to swap?

We will swap for:

  • seedlings (tomato, pepper/chilis of various kinds, greens, cucumber, eggplant, various herbs, ummmm other stuff I'm sure)
  • seeds (lots! some are listed http://growstuff.org/seeds/owner/skud but I have more that aren't listed there, too)
  • preserves (chutney, tomato sauce, plum sauce, kasundi, indian-style pickles, pear and quince jam, quince paste, I forget what else)
  • baked goods (especially fresh-baked bread or ANZAC bikkies)
  • sourdough starter
  • homemade ginger beer or ginger beer plant (seasonal, hasn't quite started yet, but will in a few weeks I think)

Oh and on the ginger beer topic, we'll also take any plastic soft drink bottles you have, especially 1.25L or 2L ones.

Drop me a note here or tweet at @Skud or email skud@infotrope.net.

Thanks!

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Smallest viable containers for tomatoes, peppers

We have an over-abundance of 20cm/8" and 25cm/10" pots. I'd normally grow peppers (mostly small ones like jalapeño pepper, not huge bell pepper) in 10" pots and tomato in 12" pots. I'm wondering whether maybe I can get away with 8" pots for the peppers, move some of the tomatoes down into 10" pots, and have more of the larger ones (12" and above) available for other things.

What do you think? What's the smallest viable container? Any tips for growing these plants in small pots?

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Too Late for Starting? - Northeast USA

I live in Massachusetts in the US, and just found out that I do, indeed, have space for planting in the giant garden that is apparently shared between the neighborhood. Is it too late to start zucchinis and watermelons? What about sauce tomatoes? I've never tried to start anything this late in the season before and am wondering if I should just go buy transplants.

ETA: According to the google machine, our last frost date is usually the end of April and first frost is in October.

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seedlings!

I have tomato seedlings! I need to see about transferring them to a larger pot than the little seedling pot they're in. I have several trays that I need to sprout some seeds in as well for other things.

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Turnip sprouts

Have you ever sprouted turnip from seed? These seeds are the same size as mustard seeds. I planted them Friday night. I had to take the lid off my tabletop greenhouse today (Monday morning) so they wouldn't hit it! They're 2 inches tall already.

And, shockingly, two tomato plants have sprouted already.

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Seeds!

All the seeds I ordered this year have shown up. I've got seeds for 7 kinds of dye plants, though I won't be planting all of those. Some of them get too big for the space I'm allocated.

I got Burpee's heirloom seeds for summer squash, purple-top white globe turnips, chioggia beets, big rainbow tomato, black krim tomato, brandywine pink tomato, and supersteak hybrid tomato. I'm about to start the seeds indoors, but the internet has just informed me that turnips are to be planted either in the fall 2 months before the first frost or in the spring a month before the last frost. They are not summer-weather-type plants. Oops. Well, I've got 3000 turnip seeds. I'll just start a handful and see what happens. The internet also says beets should just be started outside for the same taproot reason as carrots, but soak them for an hour first.

Now um...hmm..which dye plants am I starting?

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Seeds!

Yay, seeds arrived. Gonna go on a planting binge tomorrow. Especially since tomorrow is tomato day!

Got: Golden purslane Watercress Yard long bean Blackeye pea Charentais melon Cantaloupe (Minnesota Midget) Shelling pea (I ran out)

I've never grown melons before, it will be an adventure. I prepared a little raised bed filled with potting soil far away from the other beds so that they have plenty of room, though I haven't decided between sprawl and trellis. Possibly I will trellis the cantaloupe since they are supposed to be small.

I probably could've planted tomatoes two or three weeks ago the weather has been so hot. (And of course now driving all the way out to descanso gardens for the tomato festival doesn't sound like fun, and I'm tempted to see what they have at the local nursery. But I had such good yields with the kinds that I got at the tomato festival last year. I grew Sunsugar and Jetsetter and they both produced like crazy from the beginning of june to mid-october. Almost half a year of tomato season. I also got decent yields from Copper River and Mister Stripey, but I planted the wrong Mister Stripey somehow and the tomatoes just weren't good. And I don't really like green tomatoes. This year I'd like to grow Sunsugar and Jetsetter again, a paste type, and one random long-season heirloom, whatever looks interesting at the time. Maybe I'll grow Brandywine even though everyone says it never grows well in SoCal.

(Looking at tomato pr0n online is making driving to the festival seem less of a pain, at least...)

At least one edamame plant from the first planting looks like it may actually survive/grow. Second planting, of course, was only a week ago and hasn't come up yet. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Will this be the year I actually successfully grow beans?

Transplanting the cauliflower in early march looks like it was a good idea (aside from the fact that the horse broke into the garden and ate all but one). The one remaining plant has set properly instead of growing tall and weedy, so I will probably have one decent cauliflower this year and a better idea for what to do next year. Growing brassicas here is a little like trying to get blood from a stone, the climate just isn't suited, but homegrown cauliflower is just so much better than store-bought.

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  • View all tomato plantings (211)
  • View all tomato harvests (47)
  • How to grow tomatoes

    Grown for: fruit (46)

    Plant from: seedling (76), seed (61), advanced plant (12), (9), graft (3), bare root plant (1)

    Plant in: sun (152), semi-shade (39), (17)

    Scientific names

    • Solanum lycopersicum

    Alternate names

    • 🍅

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